The Grapefruit Triad, Part One -- The Siesta
The Grapefruit Triad, Part Two -- The Hemingway Daiquiri

It's Not Easy Being Green(ish) -- The Daiquiri

This might be what Kermit the Frog drinks when he's alone, with Ms. Piggy, or hanging out with the other Muppets.  He probably likes the color.  I'm just guessing.

How could time turn such a simple and wonderful cocktail turn into a sickly sweet mess?  I suggest the following reasons: (1) the far too prevalent use of prepared mixes, and (2) the tendency to overuse blenders and ice.  The first makes the cocktail too sweet, and the second makes it too cold.  Either one overpowers any flavor that’s left.

Only ron de Cuba is served at Vieja Habana in Panama City
Only ron de Cuba is served at Vieja Habana in Panama City

Just as many cinematic franchises in recent years have rebooted, gone back to the basics, and reaped serious dividends at the box office, e.g. James Bond in Casino Royale, Batman in the Dark Knight trilogy, etc., let’s return to the classic daiquiri.  There are three and only three ingredients – rum, fresh lime juice (emphasis on fresh), and simple syrup or sugar.

I prefer to shake daiquiris, but a very lightly blended daiquiri does just fine.  In fact, the best daiquiri I ever had was lightly blended with Cuban rum at Vieja Habana (Old Havana), a great Cuban bar in Panama City, Panama.  Here is my recipe:

2014-08-15_17-46-25_951 Daiquiri2.25 ounces rum
Juice from 1/2 lime
.75 ounces super simple syrup

Combine in shaker with ice, shake it like you’re doing a hyper-caffeinated version of (insert your favorite Latin American dance style here), and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with lime.

Traditionally one uses light rum.  However, I’ve used gold or dark rums and obtained very good results.  The rum I use in the pictured daiquiri is Barcelo Imperial.  It is made in the Dominican Republic, and I discovered it last year while I was on vacation in Punta Cana. It is a dark rum, so that affects the color. My suggestion – if you like a particular rum, regardless of its color or where it is produced, use it in a daiquiri.

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